Renaming .c files to .cc?

Christian Biesinger via gdb gdb@sourceware.org
Sat Dec 14 18:20:00 GMT 2019


On Thu, Dec 12, 2019 at 1:17 AM Eli Zaretskii <eliz@gnu.org> wrote:
>
> > From: Christian Biesinger <cbiesinger@google.com>
> > Date: Wed, 11 Dec 2019 17:59:39 -0500
> > Cc: gdb@sourceware.org, Pedro Alves <palves@redhat.com>
> >
> > > Not every Git command has a --follow option, so renaming files does
> > > have disadvantages in that area.
> >
> > Do you have a specific command in mind that doesn't? I haven't come
> > across that yet myself.
>
> Are you saying that every Git command supports that option?  I don't
> think so.

Sorry, that's not what I meant; I had never run into one where I
missed that option, and you sounded like you had one in mind, so I was
curious. I don't know either way if there are git commands that miss
that option.

BTW, there is a setting to make --follow the default. git config
--global log.follow true

> And even those who do support it impose limitations when it's used.
> For example,
>
>   $ git log file1 file2 ...
>
> works, but
>
>   $ git log --follow file1 file2 ...
>
> fails with an error message.  So many important forensic
> investigations limit you to single files when using --follow.

OK.

> > > Also, even with --follow, Git's tracking of renaming is heuristics,
> > > so it can fail.
> >
> > Technically correct, but not an issue in practice when files are being
> > renamed without changes, like they would be here.
>
> That's not guaranteed, because several files with similar contents can
> dupe the heuristics.
>
> Anyway, like Pedro said: the reasons for being in the "rather not"
> camp are not strong.

OK, I'll drop this.

Christian



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