[patch/5] README

Andrew Cagney ac131313@cygnus.com
Thu May 11 00:53:00 GMT 2000


FYI,

I've committed the attached.  It updates the file gdb/README.

	Andrew
Thu May 11 17:22:36 2000  Andrew Cagney  <cagney@b1.cygnus.com>

	* README: Update for GDB 5.0.

Index: README
===================================================================
RCS file: /cvs/src/src/gdb/README,v
retrieving revision 1.1.1.2.2.2
diff -p -r1.1.1.2.2.2 README
*** README	2000/05/11 00:32:18	1.1.1.2.2.2
--- README	2000/05/11 07:51:22
***************
*** 1,5 ****
! 		     README for gdb-4.18 release
! 		   Updated 4 Apr 1999 by Jim Blandy
  
  This is GDB, the GNU source-level debugger.
  A summary of new features is in the file `NEWS'.
--- 1,5 ----
! 		     README for gdb-5.0 release
! 		Updated 11 May 2000 by Andrew Cagney
  
  This is GDB, the GNU source-level debugger.
  A summary of new features is in the file `NEWS'.
*************** date release information, mailing list l
*** 11,20 ****
  Unpacking and Installation -- quick overview
  ==========================
  
! In this release, the GDB debugger sources, the generic GNU include
  files, the BFD ("binary file description") library, the readline
  library, and other libraries all have directories of their own
! underneath the gdb-4.18 directory.  The idea is that a variety of GNU
  tools can share a common copy of these things.  Be aware of variation
  over time--for example don't try to build gdb with a copy of bfd from
  a release other than the gdb release (such as a binutils or gas
--- 11,20 ----
  Unpacking and Installation -- quick overview
  ==========================
  
!    In this release, the GDB debugger sources, the generic GNU include
  files, the BFD ("binary file description") library, the readline
  library, and other libraries all have directories of their own
! underneath the gdb-5.0 directory.  The idea is that a variety of GNU
  tools can share a common copy of these things.  Be aware of variation
  over time--for example don't try to build gdb with a copy of bfd from
  a release other than the gdb release (such as a binutils or gas
*************** Configuration scripts and makefiles exis
*** 23,89 ****
  directory tree and automatically build all the pieces in the right
  order.
  
! When you unpack the gdb-4.18.tar.gz file, you'll find a directory
! called `gdb-4.18', which contains:
  
!   COPYING          config.sub*      libiberty/       opcodes/
!   COPYING.LIB      configure*       mmalloc/         readline/
!   Makefile.in      configure.in     move-if-change*  sim/
!   README           etc/             mpw-README       texinfo/
!   bfd/             gdb/             mpw-build.in     utils/
!   config/          include/         mpw-config.in
!   config.guess*    install.sh*      mpw-configure
  
  To build GDB, you can just do:
  
! 	cd gdb-4.18
  	./configure
  	make
  	cp gdb/gdb /usr/local/bin/gdb	(or wherever you want)
  
  (Building GDB with DJGPP tools for MS-DOS/MS-Windows is slightly
! different; see the file gdb/config/djgpp/README for details.)
  
! This will configure and build all the libraries as well as GDB.
! If `configure' can't determine your system type, specify one as its
! argument, e.g., sun4 or decstation.
! 
! If you get compiler warnings during this stage, see the `Reporting Bugs'
! section below; there are a few known problems.
! 
! GDB requires an ANSI C compiler.  If you do not have an ANSI C
! compiler for your system, you may be able to download and install the
! GNU CC compiler.  It is available via anonymous FTP from ftp.gnu.org,
! in /pub/gnu/gcc (as a URL, that's ftp://ftp.gnu.org/pub/gnu/gcc ).
  
- GDB can be used as a cross-debugger, running on a machine of one type
- while debugging a program running on a machine of another type.  See below.
  
- 
  More Documentation
  ******************
  
     All the documentation for GDB comes as part of the machine-readable
! distribution.  The documentation is written in Texinfo format, which is
! a documentation system that uses a single source file to produce both
! on-line information and a printed manual.  You can use one of the Info
! formatting commands to create the on-line version of the documentation
! and TeX (or `texi2roff') to typeset the printed version.
! 
!    GDB includes an already formatted copy of the on-line Info version of
! this manual in the `gdb/doc' subdirectory.  The main Info file is
! `gdb-4.18/gdb/doc/gdb.info', and it refers to subordinate files matching
! `gdb.info*' in the same directory.  If necessary, you can print out
! these files, or read them with any editor; but they are easier to read
! using the `info' subsystem in GNU Emacs or the standalone `info' program,
! available as part of the GNU Texinfo distribution.
  
     If you want to format these Info files yourself, you need one of the
  Info formatting programs, such as `texinfo-format-buffer' or
  `makeinfo'.
  
     If you have `makeinfo' installed, and are in the top level GDB
! source directory (`gdb-4.18', in the case of version 4.18), you can make
  the Info file by typing:
  
       cd gdb/doc
--- 23,92 ----
  directory tree and automatically build all the pieces in the right
  order.
  
!    When you unpack the gdb-5.0.tar.gz file, you'll find a directory
! called `gdb-5.0', which contains:
  
!   COPYING       config.if     install-sh     mmalloc         readline
!   COPYING.LIB   config.sub    intl           move-if-change  sim
!   Makefile.in   configure     libiberty      mpw-README      symlink-tree
!   README        configure.in  ltconfig       mpw-build.in    texinfo
!   bfd           djunpack.bat  ltmain.sh      mpw-config.in   utils
!   config        etc           md5.sum        mpw-configure   ylwrap
!   config-ml.in  gdb           missing        mpw-install
!   config.guess  include       mkinstalldirs  opcodes
  
  To build GDB, you can just do:
  
! 	cd gdb-5.0
  	./configure
  	make
  	cp gdb/gdb /usr/local/bin/gdb	(or wherever you want)
  
  (Building GDB with DJGPP tools for MS-DOS/MS-Windows is slightly
! different; see the file gdb-5.0/gdb/config/djgpp/README for details.)
  
!    This will configure and build all the libraries as well as GDB.  If
! `configure' can't determine your system type, specify one as its
! argument, e.g., `./configure sun4' or `./configure decstation'.
! 
!    If you get compiler errors during this stage, see the `Reporting
! Bugs' section below; there are a few known problems.
! 
!    GDB requires an ISO-C (ANSI C) compiler.  If you do not have an
! ISO-C compiler for your system, you may be able to download and
! install the GNU CC compiler.  It is available via anonymous FTP from
! the directory ` ftp://ftp.gnu.org/pub/gnu/gcc '.
! 
!    GDB can be used as a cross-debugger, running on a machine of one
! type while debugging a program running on a machine of another type.
! See below.
  
  
  More Documentation
  ******************
  
     All the documentation for GDB comes as part of the machine-readable
! distribution.  The documentation is written in Texinfo format, which
! is a documentation system that uses a single source file to produce
! both on-line information and a printed manual.  You can use one of the
! Info formatting commands to create the on-line version of the
! documentation and TeX (or `texi2roff') to typeset the printed version.
! 
!    GDB includes an already formatted copy of the on-line Info version
! of this manual in the `gdb/doc' subdirectory.  The main Info file is
! `gdb-5.0/gdb/doc/gdb.info', and it refers to subordinate files
! matching `gdb.info*' in the same directory.  If necessary, you can
! print out these files, or read them with any editor; but they are
! easier to read using the `info' subsystem in GNU Emacs or the
! standalone `info' program, available as part of the GNU Texinfo
! distribution.
  
     If you want to format these Info files yourself, you need one of the
  Info formatting programs, such as `texinfo-format-buffer' or
  `makeinfo'.
  
     If you have `makeinfo' installed, and are in the top level GDB
! source directory (`gdb-5.0', in the case of version 5.0), you can make
  the Info file by typing:
  
       cd gdb/doc
*************** the Info file by typing:
*** 92,98 ****
     If you want to typeset and print copies of this manual, you need
  TeX, a program to print its DVI output files, and `texinfo.tex', the
  Texinfo definitions file.  This file is included in the GDB
! distribution, in the directory `gdb-4.18/texinfo'.
  
     TeX is a typesetting program; it does not print files directly, but
  produces output files called DVI files.  To print a typeset document,
--- 95,101 ----
     If you want to typeset and print copies of this manual, you need
  TeX, a program to print its DVI output files, and `texinfo.tex', the
  Texinfo definitions file.  This file is included in the GDB
! distribution, in the directory `gdb-5.0/texinfo'.
  
     TeX is a typesetting program; it does not print files directly, but
  produces output files called DVI files.  To print a typeset document,
*************** without any extension or a `.dvi' extens
*** 106,116 ****
  This file tells TeX how to typeset a document written in Texinfo
  format.  On its own, TeX cannot read, much less typeset a Texinfo file.
   `texinfo.tex' is distributed with GDB and is located in the
! `gdb-4.18/texinfo' directory.
  
     If you have TeX and a DVI printer program installed, you can typeset
  and print this manual.  First switch to the the `gdb' subdirectory of
! the main source directory (for example, to `gdb-4.18/gdb') and then type:
  
       make gdb.dvi
  
--- 109,119 ----
  This file tells TeX how to typeset a document written in Texinfo
  format.  On its own, TeX cannot read, much less typeset a Texinfo file.
   `texinfo.tex' is distributed with GDB and is located in the
! `gdb-5.0/texinfo' directory.
  
     If you have TeX and a DVI printer program installed, you can typeset
  and print this manual.  First switch to the the `gdb' subdirectory of
! the main source directory (for example, to `gdb-5.0/gdb') and then type:
  
       make gdb.dvi
  
*************** preparing GDB for installation; you can 
*** 126,180 ****
  a single directory, whose name is usually composed by appending the
  version number to `gdb'.
  
!    For example, the GDB version 4.18 distribution is in the `gdb-4.18'
  directory.  That directory contains:
  
! `gdb-4.18/{COPYING,COPYING.LIB}'
       Standard GNU license files.  Please read them.
  
! `gdb-4.18/bfd'
       source for the Binary File Descriptor library
  
! `gdb-4.18/config*'
       script for configuring GDB, along with other support files
  
! `gdb-4.18/gdb'
       the source specific to GDB itself
  
! `gdb-4.18/include'
       GNU include files
  
! `gdb-4.18/libiberty'
       source for the `-liberty' free software library
  
! `gdb-4.18/mmalloc'
       source for the GNU memory-mapped malloc package
  
! `gdb-4.18/opcodes'
       source for the library of opcode tables and disassemblers
  
! `gdb-4.18/readline'
       source for the GNU command-line interface
       NOTE:  The readline library is compiled for use by GDB, but will
       not be installed on your system when "make install" is issued.
  
! `gdb-4.18/sim'
       source for some simulators (ARM, D10V, SPARC, M32R, MIPS, PPC, V850, etc)
  
! `gdb-4.18/intl'
       source for the GNU gettext library, for internationalization.
       This is slightly modified from the standalone gettext
       distribution you can get from GNU.
  
! `gdb-4.18/texinfo'
       The `texinfo.tex' file, which you need in order to make a printed
       manual using TeX.
  
! `gdb-4.18/etc'
       Coding standards, useful files for editing GDB, and other
       miscellanea.
  
! `gdb-4.18/utils'
       A grab bag of random utilities.
  
     Note: the following instructions are for building GDB on Unix or
--- 129,183 ----
  a single directory, whose name is usually composed by appending the
  version number to `gdb'.
  
!    For example, the GDB version 5.0 distribution is in the `gdb-5.0'
  directory.  That directory contains:
  
! `gdb-5.0/{COPYING,COPYING.LIB}'
       Standard GNU license files.  Please read them.
  
! `gdb-5.0/bfd'
       source for the Binary File Descriptor library
  
! `gdb-5.0/config*'
       script for configuring GDB, along with other support files
  
! `gdb-5.0/gdb'
       the source specific to GDB itself
  
! `gdb-5.0/include'
       GNU include files
  
! `gdb-5.0/libiberty'
       source for the `-liberty' free software library
  
! `gdb-5.0/mmalloc'
       source for the GNU memory-mapped malloc package
  
! `gdb-5.0/opcodes'
       source for the library of opcode tables and disassemblers
  
! `gdb-5.0/readline'
       source for the GNU command-line interface
       NOTE:  The readline library is compiled for use by GDB, but will
       not be installed on your system when "make install" is issued.
  
! `gdb-5.0/sim'
       source for some simulators (ARM, D10V, SPARC, M32R, MIPS, PPC, V850, etc)
  
! `gdb-5.0/intl'
       source for the GNU gettext library, for internationalization.
       This is slightly modified from the standalone gettext
       distribution you can get from GNU.
  
! `gdb-5.0/texinfo'
       The `texinfo.tex' file, which you need in order to make a printed
       manual using TeX.
  
! `gdb-5.0/etc'
       Coding standards, useful files for editing GDB, and other
       miscellanea.
  
! `gdb-5.0/utils'
       A grab bag of random utilities.
  
     Note: the following instructions are for building GDB on Unix or
*************** MS-DOS/MS-Windows are in the file gdb/co
*** 183,196 ****
  
     The simplest way to configure and build GDB is to run `configure'
  from the `gdb-VERSION-NUMBER' source directory, which in this example
! is the `gdb-4.18' directory.
  
     First switch to the `gdb-VERSION-NUMBER' source directory if you are
  not already in it; then run `configure'.
  
     For example:
  
!      cd gdb-4.18
       ./configure
       make
  
--- 186,199 ----
  
     The simplest way to configure and build GDB is to run `configure'
  from the `gdb-VERSION-NUMBER' source directory, which in this example
! is the `gdb-5.0' directory.
  
     First switch to the `gdb-VERSION-NUMBER' source directory if you are
  not already in it; then run `configure'.
  
     For example:
  
!      cd gdb-5.0
       ./configure
       make
  
*************** you may need to run `sh' on it explicitl
*** 206,213 ****
       sh configure
  
     If you run `configure' from a directory that contains source
! directories for multiple libraries or programs, such as the `gdb-4.18'
! source directory for version 4.18, `configure' creates configuration
  files for every directory level underneath (unless you tell it not to,
  with the `--norecursion' option).
  
--- 209,216 ----
       sh configure
  
     If you run `configure' from a directory that contains source
! directories for multiple libraries or programs, such as the `gdb-5.0'
! source directory for version 5.0, `configure' creates configuration
  files for every directory level underneath (unless you tell it not to,
  with the `--norecursion' option).
  
*************** with the `--norecursion' option).
*** 215,224 ****
  directories in the GDB distribution, if you only want to configure that
  subdirectory; but be sure to specify a path to it.
  
!    For example, with version 4.18, type the following to configure only
  the `bfd' subdirectory:
  
!      cd gdb-4.18/bfd
       ../configure
  
     You can install `gdb' anywhere; it has no hardwired paths. However,
--- 218,227 ----
  directories in the GDB distribution, if you only want to configure that
  subdirectory; but be sure to specify a path to it.
  
!    For example, with version 5.0, type the following to configure only
  the `bfd' subdirectory:
  
!      cd gdb-5.0/bfd
       ../configure
  
     You can install `gdb' anywhere; it has no hardwired paths. However,
*************** directory.  If the path to `configure' w
*** 247,259 ****
  argument to `--srcdir', you can leave out the `--srcdir' option; it
  will be assumed.)
  
!    For example, with version 4.18, you can build GDB in a separate
  directory for a Sun 4 like this:
  
!      cd gdb-4.18
       mkdir ../gdb-sun4
       cd ../gdb-sun4
!      ../gdb-4.18/configure sun4
       make
  
     When `configure' builds a configuration using a remote source
--- 250,262 ----
  argument to `--srcdir', you can leave out the `--srcdir' option; it
  will be assumed.)
  
!    For example, with version 5.0, you can build GDB in a separate
  directory for a Sun 4 like this:
  
!      cd gdb-5.0
       mkdir ../gdb-sun4
       cd ../gdb-sun4
!      ../gdb-5.0/configure
       make
  
     When `configure' builds a configuration using a remote source
*************** called `configure' (or one of its subdir
*** 274,281 ****
  
     The `Makefile' that `configure' generates in each source directory
  also runs recursively.  If you type `make' in a source directory such
! as `gdb-4.18' (or in a separate configured directory configured with
! `--srcdir=PATH/gdb-4.18'), you will build all the required libraries,
  and then build GDB.
  
     When you have multiple hosts or targets configured in separate
--- 277,284 ----
  
     The `Makefile' that `configure' generates in each source directory
  also runs recursively.  If you type `make' in a source directory such
! as `gdb-5.0' (or in a separate configured directory configured with
! `--srcdir=PATH/gdb-5.0'), you will build all the required libraries,
  and then build GDB.
  
     When you have multiple hosts or targets configured in separate
*************** you can use it to test your guesses on a
*** 318,324 ****
       Invalid configuration `i786v': machine `i786v' not recognized
  
  `config.sub' is also distributed in the GDB source directory
! (`gdb-4.18', for version 4.18).
  
  
  `configure' options
--- 321,327 ----
       Invalid configuration `i786v': machine `i786v' not recognized
  
  `config.sub' is also distributed in the GDB source directory
! (`gdb-5.0', for version 5.0).
  
  
  `configure' options
*************** prefer; but you may abbreviate option na
*** 372,382 ****
       code which looks even vaguely suspicious.  You should only using
       this feature if you're compiling with GNU CC.  It passes the
       following flags:
! 	-Wall
  	-Wpointer-arith
- 	-Wstrict-prototypes
- 	-Wmissing-prototypes
- 	-Wmissing-declarations
  
  `--target=TARGET'
       Configure GDB for cross-debugging programs running on the specified
--- 375,387 ----
       code which looks even vaguely suspicious.  You should only using
       this feature if you're compiling with GNU CC.  It passes the
       following flags:
! 	-Wimplicit
! 	-Wreturn-type
! 	-Wcomment
! 	-Wtrigraphs
! 	-Wformat
! 	-Wparentheses
  	-Wpointer-arith
  
  `--target=TARGET'
       Configure GDB for cross-debugging programs running on the specified
*************** See the GDB manual (gdb/doc/gdb.texinfo)
*** 410,441 ****
  Kernel debugging
  =================
  
! I have't done this myself so I can't really offer any advice.
! Remote debugging over serial lines works fine, but the kernel debugging
! code in here has not been tested in years.  Van Jacobson has
  better kernel debugging, but the UC lawyers won't let FSF have it.
  
  
  Remote debugging
  =================
  
! The files m68k-stub.c, i386-stub.c, and sparc-stub.c are examples of
! remote stubs to be used with remote.c.  They are designed to run
! standalone on an m68k, i386, or SPARC cpu and communicate properly with
! the remote.c stub over a serial line.
  
! The directory gdb/gdbserver/ contains `gdbserver', a program that
  allows remote debugging for Unix applications.  gdbserver is only
! supported for some native configurations, including Sun 3, Sun 4,
! and Linux.
  
! There are a number of remote interfaces for talking to existing ROM
  monitors and other hardware:
  
  	remote-adapt.c	 AMD 29000 "Adapt"
  	remote-array.c   Array Tech RAID controller
  	remote-bug.c	 Motorola BUG monitor
-         remote-d10v.c    GDB protocol, talking to a d10v chip
  	remote-e7000.c	 Hitachi E7000 ICE
  	remote-eb.c	 AMD 29000 "EBMON"
  	remote-es.c	 Ericsson 1800 monitor
--- 415,445 ----
  Kernel debugging
  =================
  
!    I have't done this myself so I can't really offer any advice.
! Remote debugging over serial lines works fine, but the kernel
! debugging code in here has not been tested in years.  Van Jacobson has
  better kernel debugging, but the UC lawyers won't let FSF have it.
  
  
  Remote debugging
  =================
  
!    The files m68k-stub.c, i386-stub.c, and sparc-stub.c are examples
! of remote stubs to be used with remote.c.  They are designed to run
! standalone on an m68k, i386, or SPARC cpu and communicate properly
! with the remote.c stub over a serial line.
  
!    The directory gdb/gdbserver/ contains `gdbserver', a program that
  allows remote debugging for Unix applications.  gdbserver is only
! supported for some native configurations, including Sun 3, Sun 4, and
! Linux.
  
!    There are a number of remote interfaces for talking to existing ROM
  monitors and other hardware:
  
  	remote-adapt.c	 AMD 29000 "Adapt"
  	remote-array.c   Array Tech RAID controller
  	remote-bug.c	 Motorola BUG monitor
  	remote-e7000.c	 Hitachi E7000 ICE
  	remote-eb.c	 AMD 29000 "EBMON"
  	remote-es.c	 Ericsson 1800 monitor
*************** monitors and other hardware:
*** 454,487 ****
  	remote-udi.c	 AMD 29000 using the AMD "Universal Debug Interface"
  	remote-vx.c	 VxWorks realtime kernel
  
! Remote-vx.c and the vx-share subdirectory contain a remote interface for the
! VxWorks realtime kernel, which communicates over TCP using the Sun
! RPC library.  This would be a useful starting point for other remote-
! via-ethernet back ends.
! 
! Remote-udi.c and the 29k-share subdirectory contain a remote interface
! for AMD 29000 programs, which uses the AMD "Universal Debug Interface".
! This allows GDB to talk to software simulators, emulators, and/or bare
! hardware boards, via network or serial interfaces.  Note that GDB only
! provides an interface that speaks UDI, not a complete solution.  You
! will need something on the other end that also speaks UDI.
  
  
  Reporting Bugs
  ===============
  
! The correct address for reporting bugs found in gdb is
! "bug-gdb@gnu.org".  Please email all bugs, and all requests for
! help with GDB, to that address.  Please include the GDB version number
! (e.g., gdb-4.18), and how you configured it (e.g., "sun4" or "mach386
  host, i586-intel-synopsys target").  Since GDB now supports so many
! different configurations, it is important that you be precise about this.
! If at all possible, you should include the actual banner that GDB prints
! when it starts up, or failing that, the actual configure command that
! you used when configuring GDB.
! 
! For more information on how/whether to report bugs, see the GDB Bugs
! section of the GDB manual (gdb/doc/gdb.texinfo).
  
  Known bugs:
  
--- 458,493 ----
  	remote-udi.c	 AMD 29000 using the AMD "Universal Debug Interface"
  	remote-vx.c	 VxWorks realtime kernel
  
!    Remote-vx.c and the vx-share subdirectory contain a remote
! interface for the VxWorks realtime kernel, which communicates over TCP
! using the Sun RPC library.  This would be a useful starting point for
! other remote- via-ethernet back ends.
! 
!    Remote-udi.c and the 29k-share subdirectory contain a remote
! interface for AMD 29000 programs, which uses the AMD "Universal Debug
! Interface".  This allows GDB to talk to software simulators,
! emulators, and/or bare hardware boards, via network or serial
! interfaces.  Note that GDB only provides an interface that speaks UDI,
! not a complete solution.  You will need something on the other end
! that also speaks UDI.
  
  
  Reporting Bugs
  ===============
  
!    The correct address for reporting bugs found in gdb is
! "bug-gdb@gnu.org".  Please email all bugs, and all requests for help
! with GDB, to that address.  Please include the GDB version number
! (e.g., gdb-5.0), and how you configured it (e.g., "sun4" or "mach386
  host, i586-intel-synopsys target").  Since GDB now supports so many
! different configurations, it is important that you be precise about
! this.  If at all possible, you should include the actual banner that
! GDB prints when it starts up, or failing that, the actual configure
! command that you used when configuring GDB.
! 
!    For more information on how/whether to report bugs, see the GDB
! Bugs section of the GDB manual (gdb/doc/gdb.texinfo) or the
! gdb/CONTRIBUTE file.
  
  Known bugs:
  
*************** Known bugs:
*** 533,596 ****
  
    * Under Irix 6 you must build with GCC.  The vendor compiler reports
      as errors certain assignments that GCC considers to be warnings.
- 
-   * Notes for BSD/386:
-     To compile gdb-4.18 on BSD/386, you must run the configure script and
-     its subscripts with bash.  Here is an easy way to do this:
- 
- 	bash -c 'CONFIG_SHELL=/bin/bash ./configure'
- 
-     (configure will report i386-unknown-bsd).  Then, compile with the
-     standard "make" command.
    
!   * See, also the file TODO for other minor problems.
  
- GDB can produce warnings about symbols that it does not understand.  By
- default, these warnings are disabled.  You can enable them by executing
- `set complaint 10' (which you can put in your ~/.gdbinit if you like).
- I recommend doing this if you are working on a compiler, assembler,
- linker, or GDB, since it will point out problems that you may be able
- to fix.  Warnings produced during symbol reading indicate some mismatch
- between the object file and GDB's symbol reading code.  In many cases,
- it's a mismatch between the specs for the object file format, and what
- the compiler actually outputs or the debugger actually understands.
  
  
! X Windows versus GDB
! =====================
  
! You should check out DDD, the Data Display Debugger.  Here's the blurb
! from the DDD web site, http://www.cs.tu-bs.de/softech/ddd:
  
!     The Data Display Debugger (DDD) is a popular graphical user
!     interface for command-line debuggers such as GDB, DBX, JDB, WDB,
!     XDB, the Perl debugger, and the Python debugger.  Besides ``usual''
!     front-end features such as viewing source texts, DDD has become
!     famous through its interactive graphical data display, where data
!     structures are displayed as graphs. A simple mouse click
!     dereferences pointers or views structure contents, updated each
!     time the program stops. Using DDD, you can reason about your
!     application by watching its data, not just by viewing it execute
!     lines of source code.
! 
! Emacs users will very likely enjoy the Grand Unified Debugger mode;
! try typing `M-x gdb RET'.
! 
! Those interested in experimenting with a new kind of gdb-mode
! should load gdb/gdba.el into GNU Emacs 19.25 or later.  Comments
! on this mode are also welcome.
  
  
  Writing Code for GDB
  =====================
  
! There is a lot of information about writing code for GDB in the
  internals manual, distributed with GDB in gdb/doc/gdbint.texinfo.  You
  can read it by hand, print it by using TeX and texinfo, or process it
  into an `info' file for use with Emacs' info mode or the standalone
  `info' program.
  
! If you are pondering writing anything but a short patch, especially
  take note of the information about copyrights in the node Submitting
  Patches.  It can take quite a while to get all the paperwork done, so
  we encourage you to start that process as soon as you decide you are
--- 539,583 ----
  
    * Under Irix 6 you must build with GCC.  The vendor compiler reports
      as errors certain assignments that GCC considers to be warnings.
    
!    GDB can produce warnings about symbols that it does not understand.
! By default, these warnings are disabled.  You can enable them by
! executing `set complaint 10' (which you can put in your ~/.gdbinit if
! you like).  I recommend doing this if you are working on a compiler,
! assembler, linker, or GDB, since it will point out problems that you
! may be able to fix.  Warnings produced during symbol reading indicate
! some mismatch between the object file and GDB's symbol reading code.
! In many cases, it's a mismatch between the specs for the object file
! format, and what the compiler actually outputs or the debugger
! actually understands.
  
  
+ Graphical interface to GDB -- X Windows, MS Windows
+ ==========================
  
!    Several graphical interfaces to GDB are available.  You should
! check:
! 
! 	http://sourceware.cygnus.com/gdb/#gui
  
! for an up-to-date list.
  
!    Emacs users will very likely enjoy the Grand Unified Debugger mode;
! try typing `M-x gdb RET'.  Those interested in experimenting with a
! new kind of gdb-mode should load gdb/gdba.el into GNU Emacs 19.25 or
! later.  Comments on this mode are also welcome.
  
  
  Writing Code for GDB
  =====================
  
!    There is a lot of information about writing code for GDB in the
  internals manual, distributed with GDB in gdb/doc/gdbint.texinfo.  You
  can read it by hand, print it by using TeX and texinfo, or process it
  into an `info' file for use with Emacs' info mode or the standalone
  `info' program.
  
!    If you are pondering writing anything but a short patch, especially
  take note of the information about copyrights in the node Submitting
  Patches.  It can take quite a while to get all the paperwork done, so
  we encourage you to start that process as soon as you decide you are
*************** think you will be ready to submit the pa
*** 601,626 ****
  GDB Testsuite
  =============
  
! There is a DejaGNU based testsuite available for testing your newly
! built GDB, or for regression testing GDBs with local modifications.
  
! Running the testsuite requires the prior installation of DejaGNU,
! which is generally available via ftp; you'll need a pretty recent
! release.  Once DejaGNU is installed, you can run the tests in one of
! two ways:
  
!   (1)	cd gdb-4.18/gdb		(assuming you also unpacked gdb)
  	make check
  
  or
  
!   (2)	cd gdb-4.18/gdb/testsuite
  	make site.exp	(builds the site specific file)
  	runtest -tool gdb GDB=../gdb    (or GDB=<somepath> as appropriate)
  
! The second method gives you slightly more control in case of problems with
! building one or more test executables or if you are using the testsuite
! 'standalone', without it being part of the GDB source tree.
  
  See the DejaGNU documentation for further details.
  
--- 588,620 ----
  GDB Testsuite
  =============
  
!    Included with the GDB distribution is a DejaGNU based testsuite
! that can either be used to test your newly built GDB, or for
! regression testing a GDB with local modifications.
! 
!    Running the testsuite requires the prior installation of DejaGNU,
! which is generally available via ftp.  The directory
! ftp://sourceware.cygnus.com/pub/dejagnu/ will contain a recent
! snapshot.  Once DejaGNU is installed, you can run the tests in one of
! the following ways:
  
!   (1)	cd gdb-5.0
! 	make check-gdb
! 
! or
  
!   (2)	cd gdb-5.0/gdb
  	make check
  
  or
  
!   (3)	cd gdb-5.0/gdb/testsuite
  	make site.exp	(builds the site specific file)
  	runtest -tool gdb GDB=../gdb    (or GDB=<somepath> as appropriate)
  
! The last method gives you slightly more control in case of problems
! with building one or more test executables or if you are using the
! testsuite `standalone', without it being part of the GDB source tree.
  
  See the DejaGNU documentation for further details.
  


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