Community Consensus

The GNU C Library project is a consensus-based community-driven project.

The following is a list of items which have community consensus.

1. Trivial Bug-Fix Changes

* Anyone can commit a trivial patch to fix a spelling or grammatical error in a comment or manual. No developer review required. Post the patch and ChangeLog to libc-alpha/libc-ports with a short message and then push the commit.

* Anyone can commit a locale related change where a bugzilla issue exists, government sources are cited, common uses are cited, and if there is an original author for the locale, that original author ACKs the change. No developer review required. Post the the patch and ChangeLog to libc-alpha with a short message and then push the commit.

* Anyone can commit an update to the libc.pot translation file given that the new libc.pot file came from the upstream translation project. No developer review required. Post the patch and ChangeLog to libc-alpha with a short message and then push the commit.

2. Machine Changes

* If you are a maintainer for a machine you are the expert and in a position of leadership. You should post your patches to libc-alpha/libc-ports for general review, but you may immediately commit your patches without the need for review. The community trusts your leadership and experience. If you are unsure about a change seek help and ask specific machine maintainers to review your patches for logical errors.

3. Subsystem Changes

* There are no well identified subsystem maintainers. Seek the consensus of a minimum of two other senior developers before checking in your changes. If you get a scary feeling around the time you are about to push the commit, stop, and go ask for more review.

4. Bad Changes

The sources must always build and the testsuite should not regress without a clear reason posted to libc-alpha. If the build always works, and the testsuite is in a known good state, then the source is ready for any developers to commit changes. There is never any confusion about who or what patch regressed the testsuite, and bugs can be bisected because the source is always in a buildable state (or as close as possible).

* Commits that break the build are immediately reverted.

* Commits that regress the testsuite are immediately reverted.